Thursday, March 27, 2008

the nest

The Eastern Phoebe has returned finally...and has been announcing it's arrival by singing and fine tuning it's song. This time of year they chase each other, and show off their skill in flight patterns that amaze me. I notice some of them visiting old nesting sites, evaluating repairs that will need to made....sprucing up, spring cleaning the nest. Some of the nests around here are at least 5 or 6 years old. A little bit of fixing up, and they are good to go. This stands in contrast to many other birds, which build new nests each spring.

While cleaning up in the garden yesterday, I found this nest.

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I have always wanted to find a nest from the Baltimore Oriole, so my heart sort of skipped a beat when I noticed it.

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I think it is a thing of beauty. Observe the workmanship...

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I wonder which strand the bird started with,

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the weaving is tight and secure, even though the snow and rains have weathered it.

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Amazing to think this was woven with a beak.

Photobucket this bird and I....we are kindred spirits....

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14 comments:

Judy said...

"Of all the weavers that I know
The oriole is the best.
High in the branches of the tree
He hangs his cosy nest."

There are B.O's in my mother's tree behind the garage every year. I love them. I remember a story about the B.O trying to teach the other birds step by step to build a nest. One bird left after the first step and that is why that bird only builds it that way, Another bird after the second step etc etc. I will see if I can find it, it's cute.

Anne said...

That's quite the find! I miss hearing all the eastern birds chattering in the mornings in the spring. Less trees out here equals less birdsong. Sigh.

pablo said...

I was in Atwood, Kansas (extreeeeeme NW part of the state) and the huge cottonwood trees were filled with these nests. Dozens per tree. First time I'd ever seen them in the real world.

Lisa at Greenbow said...

I had the pleasure of watching a Baltimore Oriole build part of a nest one year. It is amazing how they work it. After a it becomes a sack they go inside and do a lot of weaving. You can't see what they do but they go in and out with materials. Just amazing.

Sharon said...

Birds are pretty amazing creatures!

KnitChick said...

Can you tell what materials they used? Some of it looks like shredded wood, but some looks like string or fiber? Just curious. What a thing of beauty!!

judy said...

I keep looking for one, never finding it. What a treasure!

Cathy said...

Aren't they the most amazing things? I love the colors of the bird, too. My fav nest (which I stupidly left at the MO farm) had handspun, orange baler's twine as well as haircuttings from my family in it. It fell down during a small tornado we survived.

And I forgot to pack it to bring...

But the orchard orioles are here (and Anne should find them too in Utah).

Beth S. said...

How do they DO that without the benefit of opposable thumbs?... ;-)

annmarie said...

and what a great eye for color selection that little bird has! ;)

Kristi aka Fiber Fool said...

Those are the most amazing nests! Your photos make me want to get up close and more personal with the nest I posted last week. I had never seen one with a "roof" and multiple entrances. I don't think it is occupied so I just might take a closer look when it dries up a bit from our week snow showers we've been getting.

fiberjoy said...

Makes my heart sing to see the oriole's nest.

Anonymous said...

So what are the materials? It looks to be string and thread but from where?

Liberhurg

Q said...

Wow! So very beautiful!
Sherry

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